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A Life In Music

January 4, 2016

 

Entrepreneurship is a term that’s become something of a buzzword in the 21st century. It seems everywhere you look, people are identifying themselves as entrepreneurs. But what is an entrepreneur? How might entrepreneurship be applied to a music career? Is it needed? I asked these very questions in my research on entrepreneurship instruction in college jazz programs and its impact on graduates’ careers. Here’s what I discovered.

 

The term entrepreneur originated in 1734 to “describe a person who bears the risk of profit or loss” (Moreland, 2006, p.4). More recently in 2003, the National Commission on Entrepreneurship (NCE) defined entrepreneurship as “the process of uncovering and developing an opportunity to create value through innovation” and noted that “we are living in an ‘Entrepreneurial Age’” (p. 4). 

 

In NCE’s definition of entrepreneurship, innovation is a key term. For example, the...

November 30, 2015

 

So I’m taking a slightly different approach with this post, as suggested by my good friend, John Castleman, a fabulous jazz trumpet player. John and I got into a conversation one day about my escapades as an aspiring teenage rock star growing up in New Jersey in the 1980’s. To me, my experiences seem ordinary. Apparently, though, the stories, and the way I tell them, evoke a certain nostalgia and rekindle the feelings of those carefree days of youth. And, according to John, they also give hope and inspiration to the younger generation. So a big thanks to John for his encouragement to tell these stories. I hope you will find joy and meaning in this first and others that come.

 

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After my first electric guitar, there was no turning back. I had been taking guitar lessons for 5 years, three spent intensely studying classical guitar. It was fine, great actually. I could read music ve...

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